outofficial:

Major League Baseball Hires Billy Bean
Commissioner Bud Selig announced today that former player Billy Bean has been hired as the league’s ambassador for inclusion.
"It’s ironic that I am returning to baseball to help erase the same reason I left," Bean told Outsports, referring to his departure from the game in 1995. “Our work is just beginning. I want this generation’s coming-out stories to be uplifting, happy, and inspire others to be who they are, and fulfill their true potential. At the end of the day, it’s all about giving everyone the best chance to succeed, to play free of burden.”
[more]

outofficial:

Major League Baseball Hires Billy Bean

Commissioner Bud Selig announced today that former player Billy Bean has been hired as the league’s ambassador for inclusion.

"It’s ironic that I am returning to baseball to help erase the same reason I left," Bean told Outsports, referring to his departure from the game in 1995. “Our work is just beginning. I want this generation’s coming-out stories to be uplifting, happy, and inspire others to be who they are, and fulfill their true potential. At the end of the day, it’s all about giving everyone the best chance to succeed, to play free of burden.”

[more]

I’m ashamed to admit it: Not counting my disastrous solo attempt in North Carolina in 2012, Sunday was my first time fly fishing since I lived in Colorado almost five years ago. 

My first trip to Highlands was memorable. I look forward to more such trips to North Georgia and western North Carolina after my relocation to Atlanta.

I’m ashamed to admit it: Not counting my disastrous solo attempt in North Carolina in 2012, Sunday was my first time fly fishing since I lived in Colorado almost five years ago.

My first trip to Highlands was memorable. I look forward to more such trips to North Georgia and western North Carolina after my relocation to Atlanta.

flyfishing fishing northcarolina highlands

fastcompany:

In places where only cell-phone footage can tell the story of a crisis, video experts are stepping in to make sure the footage is real.
This month developers at Amnesty International are rolling out a website that can train anyone to be a forensic expert to help analyze citizen videos.
Read More>

fastcompany:

In places where only cell-phone footage can tell the story of a crisis, video experts are stepping in to make sure the footage is real.

This month developers at Amnesty International are rolling out a website that can train anyone to be a forensic expert to help analyze citizen videos.

Read More>

nprbooks:


Dear Mr. Simon,
Hi, I am a 15 year old high school senior, and I need help.  You see, my fondest desire (right after being an MTV VeeJay Chick) is to be a reporter for NPR. I really need some career advice. Living in a town where 80% of the population have four legs and udders and the high school a nationally recognized milk tasting team, I need some outside help.

When NPR’s Tamara Keith stepped into the Weekend Edition Saturday host chair last week, she looked back to the letters she wrote when she was 15 years old — letters that helped launch her career in public radio.
“And it all started with a letter,” Tamara says. “A letter with mediocre spelling and questionable punctuation. Sitting at Scott [Simon]’s desk, getting ready for this week’s show … I’m still so grateful that my teen idols at NPR took the time to respond. Sometimes all it takes to make a difference is to write back.”
Image: Tamara Keith at 15. (Courtesy of the Keith Family)

nprbooks:

Dear Mr. Simon,

Hi, I am a 15 year old high school senior, and I need help. 
You see, my fondest desire (right after being an MTV VeeJay Chick) is to be a reporter for NPR. I really need some career advice. Living in a town where 80% of the population have four legs and udders and the high school a nationally recognized milk tasting team, I need some outside help.

When NPR’s Tamara Keith stepped into the Weekend Edition Saturday host chair last week, she looked back to the letters she wrote when she was 15 years old — letters that helped launch her career in public radio.

“And it all started with a letter,” Tamara says. “A letter with mediocre spelling and questionable punctuation. Sitting at Scott [Simon]’s desk, getting ready for this week’s show … I’m still so grateful that my teen idols at NPR took the time to respond. Sometimes all it takes to make a difference is to write back.”

Image: Tamara Keith at 15. (Courtesy of the Keith Family)